How to Achieve Supplier Diversity

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Integrity Staffing Solutions is committed to diversity among its suppliers as well as its workforce. We believe it's our differences that make us all stronger, and that what really matters are the core values of ambition, work ethic and integrity. This policy of deliberate inclusion helps us understand and anticipate the real needs of our clients, no matter who they are.

 

We'd like to share with you the basics of our Supplier Diversity Program.

 

1. Establish a process. We have found that with the best intentions in the world, action won't get taken until there's a defined program and assigned responsibilities. Our active Supplier Diversity Department is the starting point and facilitator for prospective diversity businesses, from answering initial questions to directing suppliers to the appropriate decision maker.

 

2. Qualify the business. It must be at least 51% owned and controlled/operated by a U.S. citizen and one of the following categories:

African American

Asian Indian

Asian Pacific

Hispanic

Native American

LGBT

Service Disabled Veteran

Veteran

Woman

 

3. Verify certification. We recommend that prospective suppliers obtain certification from one (or more) of these organizations:

Ethnic minorities: National Minority Supplier Development Council or regional affiliate, nmsdcus.org

Women: Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, wbenc.org

Service-disabled veteran or veteran owned: U.S. Dept. of Veteran Affairs, va.gov

LGBT: National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce, nglcc.org

 

4. Register the supplier. We welcome the new partner and offer guidance and consultations to help further develop their business.

 

If you know a minority business who's interested in becoming a vendor for Integrity Staffing, please have them contact us at 302-504-9896 or email mailto:supplierdiversity@IntegrityStaffing.com.

 

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