It's Mental Health Awareness Month — So Let's Talk About It

  • mentalhealth

 

It's estimated that one in four people in America has a mental health issue at some time in their lives. Yet, even though it's so common, nobody wants to talk about it — either their own or anyone else's.

 

That's too bad, because talking can often reduce the fear, shame and anger people might feel towards someone suffering with mental illness, and go a long way towards helping the sufferer feel better too.

 

Is there someone you need to start a conversation with? Here are some tips.

 

Plan a good time.

Right in the middle of a busy day is not the moment to suddenly say, "I have something important to tell you about myself" or "I've noticed you seem really down/stressed/angry lately." Pick a time when both of you will have at least 30 minutes for uninterrupted talk.

 

Be prepared for a discouraging reaction.

Many people are extremely uncomfortable talking about mental health, or may be in denial about their own situation. They might push you away with, "you're just having a bad week" or "there's nothing wrong with me." Try to help them see that it's no different from having a physical illness, with well-known symptoms and treatments.

 

Discuss the details.

Some questions that might come up: What does it feel like, how long has this been going on, and what event triggered it. This is an important step toward shared understanding and the relief of knowing that nobody has to go through it alone.

 

Talk about the next step.

Often the hardest part of treating mental illness is getting the courage to start treatment in the first place. This conversation may be just the kickstart that's needed to contact a help line, make an appointment with a mental health professional, etc.

 

If you think your friend is in a real crisis, please don't hesitate to call 1-800-273-TALK (8255), text 741741 or call 911.

 

Remember, getting better can take a while.

Whether the mental health issue is something that normally goes away with time (such as getting over a bad breakup) or a long-standing condition, it won't be fixed overnight. Keep the lines of communication open and your eyes on the prize — it's the best gift you can give your friend or yourself.

 

You might be interested in...

6.16.17
Easing the Transition from High School to Working Full-Time
  As we all know, high school is a world unto itself. Its definitions of success, expectations of behavior and tactics for achieving your goals are all quite a bit different from those of adult employment. Here are some things you should know to lessen the culture shock.   Be a self-starter. You see this phrase a lot in help wanted ads, but what does it mean? It means that you will no longer have parents and teachers repeatedly reminding you to get your tasks done. Your boss certainly won't do it. It's all on you now.   What was uncool is now cool. In high school, it was definitely not cool to be the eager beaver who was the first one in the classroom door and stayed late to ask questions. In the working world, it's the eager beaver who gets the pay raises and promotions.   Be flexible. The words "it's not my job" should never come out of your mouth. As the rookie on the team, you're expected to do anything and everything that's asked of you — and do it with a...
Read More
6.01.17
It's National Safety Month — Our Experts Weigh In
  At Integrity Staffing, we have comprehensive safety policies and procedures in place to protect both our workers and clients from harm to people and property (and insurance rates). It's so important to us that we even offer all potential clients a free safety consultation by our OSHA-certified experts!   But simply passing out a handbook is not enough. Employees must be encouraged and enabled to identify risky behaviors and make smart safety decisions every day. Here are our experts' top tips for creating a safe work environment.   Wear the safety gear. Every single time. There should be no exceptions, even for a task that will only take 5 seconds. That's long enough to have an accident.   No shortcuts with the machinery. Built-in safeguards on tools and equipment may give you a sense of security — but they only work if employees are using them correctly.   Promote constant awareness. Just as they teach you in driving school, workers should keep a watch on...
Read More
5.23.17
Helping Your Transgender Employee Feel Comfortable
  Workplace diversity is a deep commitment at Integrity. As both a staffing industry leader and minority-owned business, we've had a unique opportunity to prove that character values like work ethic and team spirit are what make a successful employee, not vital statistics like ethnicity or gender.   The rights of transgender individuals are gaining broader acceptance in our society (and in the law courts). Smart businesses are keeping pace with steps to ensure that these employees are welcomed and protected from discrimination just like any other minority.   Here are our top tips for making it happen.   Put the policy in writing. You probably have a discrimination policy already, so it's simple to add transgender people to the handbook and sexual harassment training. There should also be procedures established for people already in your employment who decide to transition: leave benefits, name changes, a designated point person to manage the process and so on....
Read More
General

Title

More Info
You need an account to do that Set up an account Never Mind

Please register for an account first. If you already have one, log in here.