Helping Your Transgender Employee Feel Comfortable

  • transgenderemployee

 

Workplace diversity is a deep commitment at Integrity. As both a staffing industry leader and minority-owned business, we've had a unique opportunity to prove that character values like work ethic and team spirit are what make a successful employee, not vital statistics like ethnicity or gender.

 

The rights of transgender individuals are gaining broader acceptance in our society (and in the law courts). Smart businesses are keeping pace with steps to ensure that these employees are welcomed and protected from discrimination just like any other minority.

 

Here are our top tips for making it happen.

 

Put the policy in writing.

You probably have a discrimination policy already, so it's simple to add transgender people to the handbook and sexual harassment training. There should also be procedures established for people already in your employment who decide to transition: leave benefits, name changes, a designated point person to manage the process and so on.

 

Let them do the telling.

Transgender employees should decide when and how to communicate this information to co-workers: face-to-face or by email, in private conversations or to the whole team at once. It is not the supervisor's or HR's place to "out" them without their permission.

 

Make a restroom plan.

This is the biggest hot button you're likely to encounter. Ideally, you have enough restrooms that one could be designated gender neutral. If that's not feasible, most companies say that individuals should use the restroom of the gender they identify with.

 

Watch out for harassment.

Of course, major discriminatory actions such as denial of employment or promotion will be covered in your policy. But also be alert for subtle behaviors such as co-workers refusing to use the individual's "new" name or pronoun or leaving him/her out of team activities. And be aware that LGBT workers are legally protected from objections on religious grounds.

 

It's been demonstrated time and again that the diverse workplace is more innovative, productive and profitable than the homogenous one. With a little care and consideration, any business can achieve this goal ... and reap the rewards.

 

You might be interested in...

7.03.17
Fun Places to Volunteer that Look Great on Your Resume
  You could spend the summer just hanging out with your friends. Or you could spend part of it supporting a good cause, pursuing your interests, and amping up your resume at the same time. That's what we call a win-win!   Below are some types of volunteer work that don't require any previous experience. In all of them, you'll find numerous opportunities beyond the job description to expand your skills — from office and computer work, to advertising and public relations, to adding valuable connections to your professional network.   Habitat for Humanity Help build or repair homes for people who can't afford to do it themselves. Construction experience is helpful but not necessary as you can learn on the job (they even have a special program for women). You can also learn team building and leadership skills.   Animal Shelters Caring for and socializing with animals is just the beginning of volunteer activities at the shelter. You can also provide administrative support...
Read More
6.16.17
Easing the Transition from High School to Working Full-Time
  As we all know, high school is a world unto itself. Its definitions of success, expectations of behavior and tactics for achieving your goals are all quite a bit different from those of adult employment. Here are some things you should know to lessen the culture shock.   Be a self-starter. You see this phrase a lot in help wanted ads, but what does it mean? It means that you will no longer have parents and teachers repeatedly reminding you to get your tasks done. Your boss certainly won't do it. It's all on you now.   What was uncool is now cool. In high school, it was definitely not cool to be the eager beaver who was the first one in the classroom door and stayed late to ask questions. In the working world, it's the eager beaver who gets the pay raises and promotions.   Be flexible. The words "it's not my job" should never come out of your mouth. As the rookie on the team, you're expected to do anything and everything that's asked of you — and do it with a...
Read More
6.01.17
It's National Safety Month — Our Experts Weigh In
  At Integrity Staffing, we have comprehensive safety policies and procedures in place to protect both our workers and clients from harm to people and property (and insurance rates). It's so important to us that we even offer all potential clients a free safety consultation by our OSHA-certified experts!   But simply passing out a handbook is not enough. Employees must be encouraged and enabled to identify risky behaviors and make smart safety decisions every day. Here are our experts' top tips for creating a safe work environment.   Wear the safety gear. Every single time. There should be no exceptions, even for a task that will only take 5 seconds. That's long enough to have an accident.   No shortcuts with the machinery. Built-in safeguards on tools and equipment may give you a sense of security — but they only work if employees are using them correctly.   Promote constant awareness. Just as they teach you in driving school, workers should keep a watch on...
Read More
General

Title

More Info
You need an account to do that Set up an account Never Mind

Please register for an account first. If you already have one, log in here.