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12.28.15
How to Make More Money in 2016
Think you deserve a raise or a promotion? Well, the reality is, you probably won't get one unless you ask for it.   Gone are the days of automatic yearly increases for all employees. You might think this trend started with the recent economic crunch, but it actually goes back long before that. We'll save the reasons behind it for another article; what you want to know right now is how to get more money in your pocket every payday.   1. Don't ask during your performance review. For one thing, many companies have already finalized their payroll budget before they start holding annual employee reviews. This makes it easy for them to tell you it's too late to change anything. Try to schedule your salary meeting two months in advance of your normal review month.   Also, the review is often focused on things the employee needs to improve; or, in less politically correct wording, what you did wrong last year. You want your salary conversation to be all about what you did right....
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12.21.15
Creating the Perfect Profile Picture
As we've mentioned before, almost all hiring managers now check a job candidate's social media pages before making an offer, sometimes even before asking for an interview. Do you want their first look at you to be: (A) you in your teeny tiny tank top partying the night away, or (B) you dressed and posed like the highly paid professional you hope to become?   We suggest that you invest a bit of time and money in getting a classic profile photo you can be proud of, and use for years to come. If it gets employers to take you seriously when they didn't before, it could pay for itself many times over.   Here are a few tips for the perfect profile picture:   No selfies. Bite the bullet and shell out for a professional quality portrait. Even a cheap passport/ID photographer has better lighting and camera equipment — and the knowledge to use them — than you do.   No wing men/women. This is one of the most frequent problems with your average Facebook profile photo. Having...
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12.14.15
Want to Know Why You're Not Getting Hired?
Sometimes job seekers do things with the best of intentions, but their actions give a completely different impression from what they meant. Let's look at our top 3 unintentional resume and interview fails, and see if they seem familiar.   Being a comedian. "Objective: to claw my way to the top by any underhanded means necessary, and then rule with a benevolent hand, spreading peace and justice." That's an actual quote from a resume.   The writer probably thought he was being witty and standing out from the crowd. But how did he come across to the recruiter? He failed on two counts: he did not provide the necessary information about himself, and he gave the impression that he did not take the job opportunity seriously.   It would have been far better to skip the humor and stick to what the employer was looking for: reasons why hiring this candidate would benefit the company the most.   Being a distraction. By that we mean anything that distracts the hiring manager's...
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12.07.15
5 Words That Will Destroy Your Image At Work
People will say them behind your back. They may even say them to your face. Either way, these 5 words could spell the end of your chances for promotions, raises and good relationships with your peers.   Selfish If this is said about you it could mean several things: you've taken the credit for work that was done by the whole team; refused to help out when a team member was overloaded; or even hogged the office supplies.   Lazy Do you habitually come in late and/or sneak out early? Take a lot of sick days? Spend your slow times making personal phone calls instead of finding something work-related to do? Have the lowest productivity rating of your group?   Rude This generally boils down to being inconsiderate of people's needs and feelings. Forgetting to always say "please" and "thank you" might not be a deal breaker, but constantly interrupting and not letting others talk definitely is.   Angry Yeah, sometimes you have to stick up for what you believe is right....
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11.30.15
You Might Have Forgotten This Important Step in Your Last Interview
You've worked hard to present yourself and your qualifications as perfectly as possible. You've handled the interview well, and believe you've given them good reasons why they should want you to work for them.   But did you find out whether YOU want to work for them?   Most job applicants are so focused on making a good impression that they get tunnel vision while they're on company property: they see nothing but the interviewer and his/her reactions to what they're saying.   Big mistake! Next time you go on an interview, keep your eyes open to what kind of a work environment you might be getting into. Then you can decide whether it's a culture you'll be comfortable with, or whether you'll be wanting out in a few months.   When you pass employees in the hall, do their smiles look fake or real (or non-existent)? Is the atmosphere casual and fun, or serious and business-like? Is there a lot of movement and collaboration going on, or is everyone glued to their work...
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11.23.15
An Easy Guide to Answering “So, Tell Me About Yourself”
Interviewers love to ask this question. Why? Because it reveals more about the job candidate than you might think.   If you can come up with a good answer, it tells them that you (A) can think on your feet, and (B) understand the needs of the job and company you're interviewing for. Read through the following tips and you'll see what we mean.   1. Be prepared. Hesitating or stammering when this question is thrown at you will give the impression that you lack awareness both of yourself and the job requirements. Memorize an opening statement that you can deliver quickly and confidently.   2. Keep it short. We believe your first response should be no longer than a TV commercial: 30 seconds. If the interviewer wants you to go into more detail about a particular point, he/she will ask.   3. Make it all about them. Remember, you're there to sell yourself as the answer to their problem: which candidate will be the biggest asset to their company. Information about your...
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11.16.15
How to Use the Holidays to Your Advantage in the Job Hunt
Are we crazy? Isn't this the very worst time of year to be looking for work?   Actually, no, it isn't. Contrary to what most job seekers believe, the holidays can be one of the best times to make progress in your job search, and here's why.   It's all about networking — getting the word out that you're searching for that next great opportunity. The holidays give you the perfect excuse to work your contacts without seeming pushy or needy. After all, 'tis the season for getting in touch and catching up on each other's lives. Your current employment situation would just come up naturally in the course of these activities.   Greeting cards/emails. People are still impressed to receive a beautiful card with a personalized, handwritten note in the mail, but if you're short on time an e-card can also be very effective.   Social media. Post good wishes for the holidays and a short "what's happening with me" report on the social media pages of people who could provide...
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11.02.15
How Am I Supposed to Get a Job When I Have No Work Experience?
If it's any comfort to you, you're not alone. This is the roadblock faced by all new graduates, as well as people of any age who are changing careers. Even those who have an employment history but it's not recent — for example, if they left the workforce to raise children — often have trouble competing in the job market.   Here at Integrity Staffing Solutions, we have counseled thousands of individuals caught in this dilemma, and learned which strategies are the most successful for overcoming it. Below are our top 3 tips to get you started on the path to your dream job.   1. Translate your non-work experience into marketable skills. There may be a wealth of activities in your background that you didn't get paid for, but will demonstrate that you'd make an excellent employee. Look for those that allowed you to develop your organizational, leadership, communication and/or teamwork abilities, and focus on them in your resume. How about:   School group projects Officer of...
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10.26.15
You Failed Your Interview, It's all Over, Right?
Not necessarily. Recruiters understand that the pressure of the interview situation makes it nearly impossible not to mess up some way, somehow, and really don't expect you to be perfect (unless you're applying for the job of brain surgeon). So maybe it's not as bad as you think, and maybe you still have a chance at this job if you do a little damage control. The most important thing is not to give up and just walk away. Even if this job is a lost cause, you never know when you might meet this interviewer again, either for a different job at the same company or for another company that the interviewer has moved to. Do you want to leave the impression that you're a quitter? Here are 3 steps you can take to try and recover from your mistake. 1. Think back. Analyze what happened and exactly what you think gave the interviewer a bad impression. Stick to definite feedback that you received during the interview, not just a "feeling" that something you said wasn't received well....
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10.16.15
The Right Way to Ask Someone to Hook You Up with a Job
One of the best ways to find a job is through a referral from a friend or professional contact who works at an organization you want to work for. Not only do you learn about job openings that may not have been advertised, but company hiring managers often give preferential treatment to a candidate recommended by a current employee. Take a look at the websites of companies your friends and network contacts work for, to see if there are any job postings that fit your skills. If there are, the next step is to contact your acquaintance and ask for a referral. Here are a few things to keep in mind when you do. 1. Keep it light. No matter how desperately you want the job, don't pass that pressure onto your friend or imply that he's obligated to do you this favor. Instead of bluntly asking, "Can you refer me," say something like, "Would you feel comfortable mentioning me to your hiring manager?" 2. Email, don't call. In the spirit of "no pressure," we suggest that it's better to...
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