Blog

8.29.16
New to Interviewing? Our Top 5 Need-to-Knows
At Integrity, we interview hundreds, sometimes thousands, of job applicants per month. Here are what our interviewers say are the most important things to get right if you want to get the job.   1. Do your homework. Before you set foot in the interview room, you should be familiar with the employer and the requirements of the job. At the very least, research the company's website, so you know what they do. You will be expected to make relevant comments about their operations and how you see yourself filling their needs.   2. Rehearse. As any performer will tell you, it's impossible to show at your best without some practice ahead of time. Check out the internet for common interview questions and plan how you will answer them. Also, rehearse your body language: positive energy, firm handshake, confident eye contact, no mumbling, no nervous habits, etc. Having a friend play the role of interviewer can be a great help with this.   3. Polish your image. Image may not...
Read More
8.15.16
5 Public Speaking Tips You Can Use to Ace the Interview
  There are a lot of similarities between giving a speech and going on a job interview. In both situations, you're on show. Your aim is to convince your "audience" of something (like, you're perfect for the job). And you know the audience is watching and judging your every move.   Here's some great advice from some of the country's most popular speakers, which applies equally whether you're in front of one person or a hundred.   1. Research your audience. Guy Kawasaki, the famous guru of business presentations, once showed up to give a speech in Vancouver dressed in a Canucks jersey, and opened with a personal story that related to the sponsoring organization's mission. This is a great example of playing to the audience/prospective employer's interests and needs; and he couldn't have done it without prior research.   2. Be clear about your message. Narrow down the points you want to get across until they are crystal clear in your mind, says bestselling public...
Read More
5.30.16
3 Wrong Answers to "Why Do You Want This Job?"
  At Integrity Staffing Solutions we interview tens of thousands of job applicants every year, and we're always surprised at how many people are thrown for a loop by this question. It's usually because they were unprepared for it, and as a result their answer didn't show them at their best. Here are the 3 most common mistakes we see.   1. A flippant or meaningless answer. "Because I really need money" [wink wink]. "Because, um, yeah, this seems like a great place to work." Not the response of a competent, committed candidate, right? A better answer would be to explain how the position will fit your skills and allow you to advance your career — a win-win for you and the employer.   2. A generic answer. It's not a good idea to memorize one answer and use it every place you apply. The hiring professional will recognize that it's just pre-programmed interview-speak, and will have learned nothing about your suitability for the job. Since you are researching the company...
Read More
3.28.16
3 Things I Wish I Knew Before My Interview
You thought you were well prepared. But once you got in there, you (and the interviewer too, no doubt) realized that some of your comments — or silences — showed a few bases you failed to cover.   1. I wish I knew more about the company. These days, you're expected to do some research on what the business does, who its customers and competitors are, and what sort of economic climate it's operating in at the moment. This will enable you to answer questions like, "How do you see yourself contributing to our company's success?" in a more relatable, solutions-oriented way. For example, you might highlight your experience with a technology you know the company has just implemented.   2. I wish I knew it was OK to ask questions. Don't just prepare answers. The interview is a two-way street and you need to learn whether you want to work there as much as they need to learn whether they want you. You both will be better assured of a good fit if you get a realistic picture of...
Read More
3.21.16
Is Your Job Candidate Bluffing? 3 Ways to Find Out
Some people will fill their resumes and interview responses with whatever they think you want to hear, regardless of whether it's 100% true. They think you won't know the difference, but here's how to prove them wrong.   1. Background checks. We don't just mean criminal records. Also verify educational credentials and employment history; these are the two most common areas for "exaggerating," and even some of the nation's top executives have been guilty of it.   You can hire a service to do the checking for you. You can also do a little investigating on your own. See if a candidate's social media pages contain discrepancies: different schools, degrees or employment dates on different sites. Contact previous supervisors, not just the employer's HR department, for more honest reports of the individual's capabilities.   2. Real-world skills tests. It's easy for candidates to tick boxes on a list of job requirements. It's not so easy to demonstrate that they can actually...
Read More
3.07.16
Finally, a Few Great Questions to Ask Your Future Employer in Your Next Interview
You've already heard the most common recommendations: questions that are really designed to show the hiring manager what a great candidate you are. And you should definitely include them. But there's another great way to build rapport with your interviewer: change the focus from your skills and goals to the company's needs and wants.   These 4 questions not only open up discussions of how hiring you can help solve the employer's problems, they also give you a much clearer picture of what it's really like to work there.   1. What are the company's biggest worries for the present and future? You have (ideally) already researched their industry, competitors, etc. Now ask for their view from the inside, something you can never get from Google. You'll also learn what your prospects are for career growth.   2. What is the most challenging aspect of working here? If you're lucky, you might get an honest opinion about budget constraints, management weaknesses or customer...
Read More
11.30.15
You Might Have Forgotten This Important Step in Your Last Interview
You've worked hard to present yourself and your qualifications as perfectly as possible. You've handled the interview well, and believe you've given them good reasons why they should want you to work for them.   But did you find out whether YOU want to work for them?   Most job applicants are so focused on making a good impression that they get tunnel vision while they're on company property: they see nothing but the interviewer and his/her reactions to what they're saying.   Big mistake! Next time you go on an interview, keep your eyes open to what kind of a work environment you might be getting into. Then you can decide whether it's a culture you'll be comfortable with, or whether you'll be wanting out in a few months.   When you pass employees in the hall, do their smiles look fake or real (or non-existent)? Is the atmosphere casual and fun, or serious and business-like? Is there a lot of movement and collaboration going on, or is everyone glued to their work...
Read More
11.23.15
An Easy Guide to Answering “So, Tell Me About Yourself”
Interviewers love to ask this question. Why? Because it reveals more about the job candidate than you might think.   If you can come up with a good answer, it tells them that you (A) can think on your feet, and (B) understand the needs of the job and company you're interviewing for. Read through the following tips and you'll see what we mean.   1. Be prepared. Hesitating or stammering when this question is thrown at you will give the impression that you lack awareness both of yourself and the job requirements. Memorize an opening statement that you can deliver quickly and confidently.   2. Keep it short. We believe your first response should be no longer than a TV commercial: 30 seconds. If the interviewer wants you to go into more detail about a particular point, he/she will ask.   3. Make it all about them. Remember, you're there to sell yourself as the answer to their problem: which candidate will be the biggest asset to their company. Information about your...
Read More
11.16.15
How to Use the Holidays to Your Advantage in the Job Hunt
Are we crazy? Isn't this the very worst time of year to be looking for work?   Actually, no, it isn't. Contrary to what most job seekers believe, the holidays can be one of the best times to make progress in your job search, and here's why.   It's all about networking — getting the word out that you're searching for that next great opportunity. The holidays give you the perfect excuse to work your contacts without seeming pushy or needy. After all, 'tis the season for getting in touch and catching up on each other's lives. Your current employment situation would just come up naturally in the course of these activities.   Greeting cards/emails. People are still impressed to receive a beautiful card with a personalized, handwritten note in the mail, but if you're short on time an e-card can also be very effective.   Social media. Post good wishes for the holidays and a short "what's happening with me" report on the social media pages of people who could provide...
Read More
9.25.15
The Biggest Interview Mistake You Don’t Want to Make
In the thousands of job interviews we at Integrity Staffing Solutions conduct every year, we’ve seen some pretty outrageous mistakes, from bringing breakfast (and eating it while talking) to showing up in a torn T-shirt and cutoffs.   The Mistake: Being Unprepared. However, in our opinion, the one mistake that will do the most damage to your chance of getting hired is not doing your homework ahead of time. For one thing, knowing something about the company you’re interviewing with will help you explain how you can contribute to their success. For another, not bothering to do any research tells them you’re lazy and/or not really interested in working there.   3 Ways to Avoid It: Research, Research, Research.   Research the company. Read their website thoroughly, until you’re confident you understand their business, vision, culture, challenges and recent events or changes. Check out their social media pages (Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.). Google the company and see what...
Read More
1 2
General

Title

More Info
You need an account to do that Set up an account Never Mind

Please register for an account first. If you already have one, log in here.