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8.15.16
5 Public Speaking Tips You Can Use to Ace the Interview
  There are a lot of similarities between giving a speech and going on a job interview. In both situations, you're on show. Your aim is to convince your "audience" of something (like, you're perfect for the job). And you know the audience is watching and judging your every move.   Here's some great advice from some of the country's most popular speakers, which applies equally whether you're in front of one person or a hundred.   1. Research your audience. Guy Kawasaki, the famous guru of business presentations, once showed up to give a speech in Vancouver dressed in a Canucks jersey, and opened with a personal story that related to the sponsoring organization's mission. This is a great example of playing to the audience/prospective employer's interests and needs; and he couldn't have done it without prior research.   2. Be clear about your message. Narrow down the points you want to get across until they are crystal clear in your mind, says bestselling public...
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11.23.15
An Easy Guide to Answering “So, Tell Me About Yourself”
Interviewers love to ask this question. Why? Because it reveals more about the job candidate than you might think.   If you can come up with a good answer, it tells them that you (A) can think on your feet, and (B) understand the needs of the job and company you're interviewing for. Read through the following tips and you'll see what we mean.   1. Be prepared. Hesitating or stammering when this question is thrown at you will give the impression that you lack awareness both of yourself and the job requirements. Memorize an opening statement that you can deliver quickly and confidently.   2. Keep it short. We believe your first response should be no longer than a TV commercial: 30 seconds. If the interviewer wants you to go into more detail about a particular point, he/she will ask.   3. Make it all about them. Remember, you're there to sell yourself as the answer to their problem: which candidate will be the biggest asset to their company. Information about your...
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8.28.15
5 Presentation Techniques Really Successful Public Speakers Use
Sooner or later, most company leaders find themselves having to give a presentation, whether to prospective customers, industry peers or employees. If sales or educational roles aren’t within your normal range of responsibilities, this can be a daunting proposition. Here are 5 tips for giving a presentation that connects with your audience.   Be yourself. It is essential to sell yourself before you sell your message, according to Dananjaya Hettiarachchi, Toastmasters International Champion for 2014. The more authentic you are, the more your listeners will trust what you say. Boost your confidence by remembering these two things: you know this stuff, or you wouldn’t be the one doing the presenting; and keep your language conversational, rather than like an actor reading a script.   Have a strong message. Pick one clear thought that you want to communicate, and stick to that story line throughout the presentation, says bestselling public speaking author Carmine Gallo....
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2.12.15
Professional Networking 101
You’ve probably read, in this blog and elsewhere, that your network of contacts is an excellent source of news about job opportunities — usually better ones than what shows up on the job boards. But how do you build that network?   Here are some pointers to get your name and face into the minds of those who can help you up the next rung of your career ladder.   Develop a good elevator pitch. An elevator pitch is what you say about yourself to someone you just met in the elevator. This “speech” should be about 30 seconds long (the length of an elevator ride) and should be a summary of what you do, your strengths and abilities. Use your elevator pitch whenever you’re meeting people you’d like to network with.   Put yourself out there. The only way to add people to your network is to get out and meet them — lots of them. Attend conferences, workshops, events, alumni associations, etc. Join Linked-In and Twitter groups for your profession. Think about where else the people...
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