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7.03.17
Fun Places to Volunteer that Look Great on Your Resume
  You could spend the summer just hanging out with your friends. Or you could spend part of it supporting a good cause, pursuing your interests, and amping up your resume at the same time. That's what we call a win-win!   Below are some types of volunteer work that don't require any previous experience. In all of them, you'll find numerous opportunities beyond the job description to expand your skills — from office and computer work, to advertising and public relations, to adding valuable connections to your professional network.   Habitat for Humanity Help build or repair homes for people who can't afford to do it themselves. Construction experience is helpful but not necessary as you can learn on the job (they even have a special program for women). You can also learn team building and leadership skills.   Animal Shelters Caring for and socializing with animals is just the beginning of volunteer activities at the shelter. You can also provide administrative support...
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5.09.16
Don't Just Copy and Paste: 4 Things to Put on LinkedIn But Not Your Resume
LinkedIn.com is a great way to get your name and skills in front of a wide audience and build your professional network. On the other hand, your resume should be tailored to a specific audience — the company you're applying with — in order to clearly show why you are the best candidate for that job. Here's what to edit out:   1. Irrelevant experience. Your high school burger slinging job is of no interest to a hiring manager who's looking for computer programmers. Get rid of it and use that space to elaborate on previous jobs, skills and accomplishments the recruiter really needs to know about.   2. Personal information. Your age (birth date), marital status, ethnicity, etc. should not be a factor in the hiring decision, so should not be on your resume. Exceptions to this rule, such as good physical condition needed for a job as a scuba diver, will be noted in the job requirements. Also leave out personal interests and hobbies, unless your experience with them somehow...
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3.07.16
Finally, a Few Great Questions to Ask Your Future Employer in Your Next Interview
You've already heard the most common recommendations: questions that are really designed to show the hiring manager what a great candidate you are. And you should definitely include them. But there's another great way to build rapport with your interviewer: change the focus from your skills and goals to the company's needs and wants.   These 4 questions not only open up discussions of how hiring you can help solve the employer's problems, they also give you a much clearer picture of what it's really like to work there.   1. What are the company's biggest worries for the present and future? You have (ideally) already researched their industry, competitors, etc. Now ask for their view from the inside, something you can never get from Google. You'll also learn what your prospects are for career growth.   2. What is the most challenging aspect of working here? If you're lucky, you might get an honest opinion about budget constraints, management weaknesses or customer...
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2.29.16
If It's Too Good to Be True, Your Job Offer Is a Scam!
The growth of the online job market has made it easier than ever to find your dream job. Unfortunately, it has also made it easier for scammers to find you. Here are 3 red flags that what sounds like a great buy-in is really a big rip-off.   1. You need to pay money for something. The "employers" might say they need an advance for work permits, travel expenses or training. Even sneakier, they might send you a cashier's check for a huge amount, tell you to deduct the expenses and send back the rest. Trouble is, the check is forged and when it bounces your bank will take that money out of YOUR account. A cashier's check is no guarantee of safety. And run from anyone who wants you to deal in untraceable moneygrams.   Real employers will never ask for money up front, or try to obtain your confidential financial or personal information.   2. The compensation is unrealistically high. $500 to work one hour as a secret shopper? Yeah, right. Scammers will try to lure you by...
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2.22.16
5 Ways to Take Your Social Media Recruiting Skills to the Next Level
With more than 90% of recruiters now using the Internet to find, screen and hire job candidates, it's not enough anymore to just post your available position on the job boards. To attract the best talent, you need to turn social media into a recruiting advantage.   1. Work your company's own social media pages. Everyone who visits your Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter pages should be aware — and be able to share — that you have an opening to fill. Some large companies even maintain a separate page just for career opportunities within the organization.   2. Use the social media site's job postings. LinkedIn charges a fee for this, but it costs nothing to use your status box for a mass broadcast to all your connections that you are hiring. On Twitter, include a hashtag such as #job or #NAJ (need a job?) in your tweet to increase response from job seekers.   3. Do your own searches. The very best prospects might not even be looking for a job right now. Social media is a great...
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11.16.15
How to Use the Holidays to Your Advantage in the Job Hunt
Are we crazy? Isn't this the very worst time of year to be looking for work?   Actually, no, it isn't. Contrary to what most job seekers believe, the holidays can be one of the best times to make progress in your job search, and here's why.   It's all about networking — getting the word out that you're searching for that next great opportunity. The holidays give you the perfect excuse to work your contacts without seeming pushy or needy. After all, 'tis the season for getting in touch and catching up on each other's lives. Your current employment situation would just come up naturally in the course of these activities.   Greeting cards/emails. People are still impressed to receive a beautiful card with a personalized, handwritten note in the mail, but if you're short on time an e-card can also be very effective.   Social media. Post good wishes for the holidays and a short "what's happening with me" report on the social media pages of people who could provide...
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5.22.15
Why Experience Is Not Enough to Land the Job
Your resume is the most impressive one in the recruiter’s pile. But when you meet your prospective employer for the interview, you avoid making eye contact, fiddle with your hair, mumble your words, or exhibit other signs that you lack confidence. Result: someone else who is less qualified — but makes a better in-person impression — gets the offer.   Why? Because your insecure manner has made the interviewer doubt whether you really command all the experience and skills that your resume claims. You’ve also shown that you may not be so good at integrating yourself with their team — an asset that is just as important to most employers.   It’s clear, then, that self-confidence will do more to help you land the job than your resume ever could. Here’s how to project that winning attitude.   Look Your Best Knowing that you’re perfectly dressed for the interview will go a long way towards boosting your confidence. In could pay off in other ways too: studies show that candidates...
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1.15.15
5 Ways to Get Your Resume the Attention It Deserves
Did you know that most recruiters and hiring managers spend 7 seconds or less looking at a resume before deciding whether to put it in the “yes” or “no” pile? So it’s imperative that you make those few seconds count, and craft a resume that stands out from the crowd of dozens, or even hundreds, it’s competing with for the recruiter’s attention. Assuming you’ve already taken care of the basics, such as triple-checking it for neatness and errors in spelling, grammar, dates, etc., here are 5 great tricks for cutting through the clutter.   Add a marketing headline. There’s a reason why ads and billboards usually feature a large banner headline: it grabs attention like nothing else. At the top of your resume, under your name and contact info, place a headline that instantly tells the reader what you have to offer. For example, someone hunting for a job in sales might write: John Applicant   555.555.5555   japplicant@email.com   Large Account Sales Professional To further...
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