Blog

8.29.16
New to Interviewing? Our Top 5 Need-to-Knows
At Integrity, we interview hundreds, sometimes thousands, of job applicants per month. Here are what our interviewers say are the most important things to get right if you want to get the job.   1. Do your homework. Before you set foot in the interview room, you should be familiar with the employer and the requirements of the job. At the very least, research the company's website, so you know what they do. You will be expected to make relevant comments about their operations and how you see yourself filling their needs.   2. Rehearse. As any performer will tell you, it's impossible to show at your best without some practice ahead of time. Check out the internet for common interview questions and plan how you will answer them. Also, rehearse your body language: positive energy, firm handshake, confident eye contact, no mumbling, no nervous habits, etc. Having a friend play the role of interviewer can be a great help with this.   3. Polish your image. Image may not...
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8.22.16
5 Tips for Transferring from the Military to a Civilian Career
                        This August, Integrity Staffing Solutions is focusing on hiring veterans of our nation's armed services (more about that below). So we thought this would be a good moment to share some of our expertise on making the leap out of uniform and into civilian success. 1. Analyze your assets. There's no doubt about it, the military provides people with skills civilian employers want. And we're not just talking about the functional expertise needed to perform a job. Companies also look for the "soft" skills that make a valuable employee: teamwork, organization, commitment and perseverance, to name a few.   2. Relate your assets to employers' needs. Often, all it takes is some smart reframing of your duties and accomplishments while in the service, both on your resume and during the interview. For example, you might never have worked in a retail store but still have relevant skills, such as inventory control, ordering supplies or providing security. One...
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8.15.16
5 Public Speaking Tips You Can Use to Ace the Interview
  There are a lot of similarities between giving a speech and going on a job interview. In both situations, you're on show. Your aim is to convince your "audience" of something (like, you're perfect for the job). And you know the audience is watching and judging your every move.   Here's some great advice from some of the country's most popular speakers, which applies equally whether you're in front of one person or a hundred.   1. Research your audience. Guy Kawasaki, the famous guru of business presentations, once showed up to give a speech in Vancouver dressed in a Canucks jersey, and opened with a personal story that related to the sponsoring organization's mission. This is a great example of playing to the audience/prospective employer's interests and needs; and he couldn't have done it without prior research.   2. Be clear about your message. Narrow down the points you want to get across until they are crystal clear in your mind, says bestselling public...
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8.08.16
How To Make A Living While Pursuing Your Passion
  Let's face it, pursuing a passion usually pays very little, or nothing at all. As an artist, student, philanthropist, future business owner or aspiring SAHM/D, you may think that the need to make money will slow down or totally stop progress toward your goal. But you're wrong.   Current trends in employment are more favorable than ever in our nation's history for creating a work schedule that accommodates your passion. Here are some of the ways that thousands of people like you are achieving their dreams while keeping a roof over their heads and food in their family's mouths.   Temporary employment. In this win-win situation, employers save money on payroll by only hiring people when and as needed, and employees work assignments that leave them time to pursue their passion or meet other responsibilities. If you do a good job on your temporary assignment, it's not uncommon to be asked back for a repeat performance. We've even known temp gigs to lead to full-time job...
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8.01.16
How to Turn Your Summer Internship Into a Job Offer
As the summer winds down and your internship along with it, you may be wondering what your next career move should be. The first place to look is right under your nose, in a full-time job with your host employer.   After all, you already have an inside track. They know you, you know them and the job openings available right now or in the near future. Nobody is in a better position than you to snap up that opportunity. Check out these tips for making it happen.   Let them know you want it. If your internship program includes progress meetings with your supervisor, make sure your long-term goals are part of the discussion. (If you aren't having such regularly scheduled meetings, ask for one.) Explain how your goals align with the company's. Then come right out and say you're interested in permanent employment with them.   Don't wait for the exit interview to do this. Your supervisor may need time to discuss the hire with senior management before a decision is made. Start...
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7.25.16
Using Bullet Journals for Work/Life Balance
  It's the latest craze in life organization. Totally adaptable to your needs, the Bullet Journal puts the past, present and future all in one place: to-do lists, appointment calendars, diet/exercise logs, budgets, diary musings and anything else you want to record. Surprisingly, it's not digital. You do it with a paper notebook and pen/pencil; although there are tons of journal page templates and ideas online.   The problem with having separate organizers for Work, Friends/Family and Personal Time is that they allow conflicting information to exist and cause you unnecessary duplication of effort. Keeping one BuJo prevents that and gives you greater efficiency in getting things done.   Even better, it gives you a bird's eye view of your entire life. You can easily see when one part is taking more than its fair share of your time and energy, and when another is being neglected. Here are a few BuJo hacks to keep your life on track.   Habit Tracker. Using colored dots on a...
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7.18.16
8 Things To Do On Your Lunch Break (Besides Eating)
  Rest, recharge, get things done — there are many ways to put this valuable slice of time to good use. And taking a break comes with one more reward: you'll return to work mentally and physically ready to handle whatever the rest of the day throws at you.   1. Take a walk. Nothing clears your mind like moving your body. Depending on your neighborhood, you could stroll through a park, go window shopping in a mall, or simply walk around your company's building and meet new people.   2. Read. Find a secluded spot to catch up on the daily news, the book club novel, your favorite WIWT blogs, or maybe something educational that will further your career. If your workplace doesn't have a quiet room, try a nearby library or café.   3. Run errands. Get chores done that are difficult or impossible on weekends: the dry cleaner, the post office, the barber. For chores you do regularly, it makes more sense to find providers near where you work than where you live. Bonus: a wide...
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7.12.16
How Will Microsoft's LinkedIn Buyout Affect Recruiters
  In early June, the world was surprised by the announcement that Microsoft had acquired LinkedIn. While it is unknown how far or in what ways their respective products and capabilities will merge, here are a few ideas that have been floating around the recruiting water cooler.   Access to LinkedIn's user database through Microsoft products. Imagine being able to import and sort LinkedIn candidates on an Excel spreadsheet, store their info in Active Directory, contact them through Outlook or Skype and keep track of their interviews on Calendar. What's more, recruiters using a LinkedIn API may find that restrictions on what types of LinkedIn data they can obtain are reduced.   Dynamics and Office 365 as recruitment management platforms. Recruiter, LinkedIn's own attempt at such a tool, has hardly been a stellar success. But a combined venture with Microsoft would streamline the recruitment process significantly.   Bing as the ultimate recruiter search engine....
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7.05.16
10 Ergonomic Fixes for Your Work Space
  Aching back, stiff neck, frequent headaches, wrist pain, eye strain, sore feet, swollen ankles, drained energy: these are just a few of the physical problems you can suffer when your work environment is working against you. Try these easy changes — the first 5 are for sitting work, the next 3 for standing work, the last 2 for everybody.   1. Check your chair height. When you sit at your desk with your hands on the keyboard, your forearms and thighs should be parallel to the floor. If the chair is too high and feet are left dangling, the pressure on your thighs will cut off circulation to your legs. Too low, and you'll end up with wrist and neck strain. If adjusting the chair to proper keyboard level makes it too high for your feet, use a small stool.   2. Check your chair depth. You should be able to sit all the way back so that the chair back supports your spine, and still have at least 4" of space between the front edge of the seat and your calves. If the chair seat...
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6.27.16
Essentials in an Office Snack Drawer
  When the mid-afternoon munchies strike, stay away from the vending machine and reach for these healthier options instead. They can all live happily in your snack drawer for at least a day or two, no refrigeration necessary.   Protein Protein is best for long-term hunger prevention, so you won't need another snack until dinner. They also don't cause blood sugar spikes and crashes like carbs. Try: Protein bar (but check labels for sugar content) Nuts and/or seeds Jerky (now available in lots of options, thanks to the Paleo Diet movement) String cheese   Carbs Carbs deliver a fast fix of mental or physical energy. Whether you crave sweet or salt, there's a high carb snack for you: Dried fruit (raisins, banana chips, etc.) Fresh fruit/veggies that have long shelf-life (apples, pears, oranges, carrots) Dark chocolate bar with at least 60% cacao (less fat, more antioxidants) Rice cakes Veggie chips Pretzels (also low in calories)   Fiber High fiber...
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